?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Times 27481 - Under the wether

Just the bare bones of a blog today, as I am suffering from a lurgy. This one took me around 40 minutes and has some very nice stuff. If you have queries, please ask, and the collective brain will furnish you with all you desire...

Across
1 Deliberately dodging physical activity (8)
SKIPPING - DD
5 Your compiler’s about to stay in the same place (6)
IBIDEM - BIDE in I'M
9 What may be grave for missing female singer! (8)
ACCENTOR - ACCENT [f]OR
10 Bird caught on Cornish river to the west (6)
FALCON - FAL 'west' of C ON
12 Ultimately serious desire to be fashionable (5)
SWISH - [seriou]S WISH
13 Georgian citizen holds end of rope, having great strength (9)
ATLANTEAN - [rop]E in ATLANTAN
14 Sore about Scottish town, she adopts Irish county (12)
WARWICKSHIRE - RAW reversed WICK IR in SHE
18 Dazzling brightness of quiet chap replacing one in home (12)
RESPLENDENCE - P LEN for I in RESIDENCE
21 Identification of disease in dogs is a diversion (9)
DIAGNOSIS - IN DOGS IS A*
23 Murder victim given grave at last in Poplar? (5)
ABELE - ABEL [grav]E
24 Make certain council leader is excluded from blame (6)
ENSURE - [c]ENSURE
25 Green pigment, one I delivered first in commercial vehicle (8)
VIRIDIAN - I RID I in VAN
26 Gentle 22’s offer? (6)
TENDER - TD (triple definition)
27 Unaccompanied song not all finding full of merriment (8)
GLEESOME - GLEE SOME

Down

1 Mad about first of seed being thinly scattered (6)
SPARSE - S[eed] in SPARE (angry/upset)
2 Island savings scheme penetrated by foreign character (6)
ISCHIA - CHI in ISA
3 In America, game to have drink before dance (9)
PUNCHBALL - PUNCH BALL
4 Reform I saw in modern evolutionary theory (3-9)
NEO-DARWINISM - I SAW IN MODERN*
6 In Scotland, finely dressed knight’s muscularity (5)
BRAWN - BRAW N
7 Enfeebled duke, abandoning our country, moved slowly round island (8)
DECREPIT - D[uk]E I in CREPT
8 Greek dramatist’s amble round end of green (8)
MENANDER - [gree]N in MEANDER
11 Instrument identified in general speech outside bar? (12)
GLOCKENSPIEL - LOCK (bar) in GEN SPIEL
15 Breaking ice a lot is — part of one’s lifestyle? (9)
SOCIALITE - ICE A LOT IS*
16 It’s inclined to go west, protected by allowance (8)
GRADIENT - DIE (go west, kick the bucket, shuffle off this...) in GRANT
17 Booth, for example, with Charlie and Jenny in? (8)
ASSASSIN - ASS (Charlie - figurative donkey) ASS (Jenny - echt donkey) IN
19 Breed of sheep doctor keeps in old Ireland (6)
MERINO - ERIN in MO
20 Tight-fisted type withholding pounds from girl (6)
MEANIE - ME[l]ANIE; I rode my bicycle past your window last night
22 Old railwaymen with points to look after (5)
NURSE - NUR (Sid Weighell's old lot) SE

Comments

( 51 comments — Leave a comment )
Page 1 of 2
<<[1] [2] >>
kevingregg
Oct. 14th, 2019 12:29 am (UTC)
21:28
Generally smooth sailing, with a couple of DNKs (ACCENTOR, PUNCHBALL American game though it be) and a couple of biffs (DECREPIT, GLOCKENSPIEL). FOI SWISH, LOI SPARSE, although I thought of it at the start; SPARE=mad? (I note the setter used 'about' 3 times--5ac, 14ac, 1d--twice for inclusion, once for reversal.) FALCON was late in coming, as I took 'to the west' as a reversal indicator. U, when next you rise from your bed of pain, there are some definitions lacking an underline, and 8d should read [gree]N.
ulaca
Oct. 14th, 2019 12:57 am (UTC)
RE: 21:28
Thanks, Kevin. I imagine you are wet but celebrating...
Re: 21:28 - kevingregg - Oct. 14th, 2019 01:51 am (UTC) - Expand
Re: 21:28 - aphis99 - Oct. 14th, 2019 03:10 am (UTC) - Expand
Re: 21:28 - kevingregg - Oct. 14th, 2019 04:39 am (UTC) - Expand
horryd
Oct. 14th, 2019 01:20 am (UTC)
Mondanity
I too was about 40 mins, sensa lurgy, but a bit the worse for wear after the Japan Scotland slug-fest. Wow! Is Our Kev into 'rugger'?

FOI 1ac SKIPPING

LOI 9ac ACCENTOR

COD 4dn NEO-DARWINISM

WOD 7dn DECREPIT





jackkt
Oct. 14th, 2019 04:03 am (UTC)
A technical DNF. One of those puzzles where I had done quite well and worked out a number of tricky words that were either unknown or forgotten, but I was still left with a couple of gaps where I wasn't convinced I'd recognise the answers when I saw them so after 40 minutes I gave up and resorted to aids. Sometimes in that situation I'd find myself determined to struggle on and not be beaten, but I was frankly bored with this one by that stage.

The answers that did for me were ATLANTEAN and VIRIDIAN, both on their first outing in a 15x15 and both now underlined in wavy red by my spellchecker. My successes were ACCENTOR and ISCHIA (also their first outing and underlined in red), and MENANDER which has appeared once before.

I'm tempted to say that in general the puzzle was bordering on the wilfully obscure without being remotely entertaining or amusing in compensation, but it could just be down to me feeling a bit grumpy. Certainly it wasn't typical Monday fare anyway.

Edited at 2019-10-14 04:06 am (UTC)
starstruck_au
Oct. 14th, 2019 05:08 am (UTC)
70:07
Yes, like Jack, I found this relying on too much obscure knowledge to be really enjoyable.

I really liked some clues, e.g. ASSASSIN, GLEESOME, DECREPIT, where the clever wordplay turns out to be surprisingly simple. But the "double obscurities" (e.g. knowing Warwickshire and Wick; ISA as a savings account and ISCHIA as an island, Atlantan and ATLANTEAN) on top of a lot of other GK (ACCENTOR, VIRIDIAN, braw and PUNCHBALL) just seemed like too much hard work.

I was happy to finish with all my guesses correct, though I did check a few items before submission.

Thanks, U, for the sheepish title and timely blog despite your indisposition. I hope you get better soon!
ulaca
Oct. 14th, 2019 05:27 am (UTC)
RE: 70:07
Pleased you didn’t write the title off as a typo...

I checked my SNITCH alignment and it is 1.26. Does this mean a) I do better on easier puzzles than harder, b) I do better on harder puzzles than easier, c) I have completely missed the point or d) I am in danger of turning into a Neutrino?
Re: 70:07 - starstruck_au - Oct. 14th, 2019 05:46 am (UTC) - Expand
RE: Re: 70:07 - ulaca - Oct. 14th, 2019 06:16 am (UTC) - Expand
starstruck_au
Oct. 14th, 2019 05:13 am (UTC)
Neutrinos for nerds
By the way, I've done some work on identifying Neutrinos and documented this on the SNITCH site under a new section. Some of you might find this interesting, as I think it allows us to differentiate Neutrinos from other fast solvers.

It also gives some insights on how I intend to update Reference solvers for the SNITCH in future months.

I will post a link that someone can unspam for me in a linked comment. And I welcome any feedback.
starstruck_au
Oct. 14th, 2019 05:15 am (UTC)
Re: Neutrinos for nerds
And the link is: https://xwdsnitch.herokuapp.com/solvers/neutrinos.

You can also browse to the normal SNITCH page and select "Neutrinos" in the top right navigation menu.
Re: Neutrinos for nerds - jackkt - Oct. 14th, 2019 06:01 am (UTC) - Expand
Re: Neutrinos for nerds - kevingregg - Oct. 14th, 2019 05:24 am (UTC) - Expand
Re: Neutrinos for nerds - starstruck_au - Oct. 14th, 2019 05:40 am (UTC) - Expand
Re: Neutrinos for nerds - sotira - Oct. 14th, 2019 08:04 am (UTC) - Expand
Re: Neutrinos for nerds - johninterred - Oct. 14th, 2019 08:30 am (UTC) - Expand
RE: Neutrinos for nerds - robrolfe - Oct. 14th, 2019 11:35 am (UTC) - Expand
Re: Neutrinos for nerds - topicaltim - Oct. 14th, 2019 11:55 am (UTC) - Expand
Strictly Come Nerding - sawbill - Oct. 14th, 2019 01:44 pm (UTC) - Expand
RE: Neutrinos for nerds - verlaine - Oct. 15th, 2019 03:33 pm (UTC) - Expand
Re: Neutrinos for nerds - dzhigit71 - Oct. 24th, 2019 12:25 pm (UTC) - Expand
Re: Neutrinos for nerds - starstruck_au - Oct. 24th, 2019 12:43 pm (UTC) - Expand
sawbill
Oct. 14th, 2019 07:18 am (UTC)
usual half hour
starstruck_au has pretty much summed it up for me. COD to FALCON.
myrtilus000
Oct. 14th, 2019 07:28 am (UTC)
Abele Dame sans Merci, thee hath in thrall...
30 mins.
Weird vocab.
Thanks setter and U.
kevingregg
Oct. 14th, 2019 07:41 am (UTC)
Re: Abele Dame sans Merci, thee hath in thrall...
'Abele', anyway, is a NYT chestnut, alternating with 'acer'.
boltonwanderer
Oct. 14th, 2019 07:46 am (UTC)
I’ve got a brand new pair of underpants..
... that’s why I sing in this key. All done in 24 minutes. GLEESOME was a bit of a biff, not quite sure if GLEE was the song or a type of singing. I knew VIRIDIAN as the Northern Ireland Electricity Service in its privatised incarnation, and ATLANTEAN as a bus made by Leyland Motors when they were still good at it. I didn’t know PUNCHBALL as a game, only as a boxer’s training accessory, but it could be nothing else. COD to MEANIE. Melanie was once a favourite of mine. What have I done to her song? Tricky in places. Thank you U and setter.
PS My avatar was in the the ST General Knowledge Crossword yesterday.

Edited at 2019-10-14 08:46 am (UTC)
sotira
Oct. 14th, 2019 07:59 am (UTC)
Abandoned with a few left, for the reasons jackkt and others have alluded to.

I did really like the SOCIALITE clue but I’m wondering why there’s a dash in it. Is that necessary for some technical reason that’s over my head?
keriothe
Oct. 14th, 2019 08:15 am (UTC)
22:45. That was a bit of a slog. I don’t know if I enjoyed it but working out obscurities from often quite devious wordplay is satisfying in its way.
johninterred
Oct. 14th, 2019 08:16 am (UTC)
Similar experience to others, not knowing PUNCHBALL, ATLANTEAN (my LOI), ABELE or MENANDER, but got there on the wordplay eventually. I did wonder if REB could mean sore to give BERWICKSHIRE for 14A, before I headed south-west to the Midlands. Held up for ages seeing FALCON as, like Kevin, I was looking for a reversal. 29:08.

Edited at 2019-10-14 08:17 am (UTC)
gothick_matt
Oct. 14th, 2019 09:05 am (UTC)
49 minutes, with it mostly being the rather "out there" vocab that others have mentioned adding to my time. Having said that, this felt like an easy breath of modern fresh air compared to another crossword I've attempted recently that shall remain nameless, so perhaps I was at least in the right frame of mind...

Hope the lurgy clears up fast, U.
pootle73
Oct. 14th, 2019 03:20 pm (UTC)
To put a name to that which shall remain nameless, was it Saturday? I found that tough going.
(no subject) - gothick_matt - Oct. 14th, 2019 06:35 pm (UTC) - Expand
pipkirby
Oct. 14th, 2019 10:46 am (UTC)
I'm on jackkt s team, found this a slog with some weird words. Had to use aids to confirm 8d and 13a and didn't understand 27a. Liked 5a, 11d, 15d. Tough and a bit too demanding.

Edited at 2019-10-14 10:46 am (UTC)
topicaltim
Oct. 14th, 2019 12:02 pm (UTC)
20:35
Tricky for a Monday, and another chewy puzzle with plenty for the classicists. However, my main hold up came from biffing SOCIALIST at 15dn, which makes no sense at all, and left me trying to find the word which would fit _L_T_O_E. There isn't one, as it turns out. I shall return tomorrow once I've bandaged this gunshot wound in my foot *limps away*
penfold_61
Oct. 14th, 2019 12:09 pm (UTC)
Re: 20:35
What a clothole.
Re: 20:35 - topicaltim - Oct. 14th, 2019 12:25 pm (UTC) - Expand
penfold_61
Oct. 14th, 2019 12:08 pm (UTC)
I found this a bit of a slog too and took 17:47. Mind you, I did miss some "quick wins", for example not spotting how straightforward 1a was, considering ISA and CHI for 2d but not together, and starting at the "wrong" end of the alphabet on the alphabet trawl for counties.
Page 1 of 2
<<[1] [2] >>
( 51 comments — Leave a comment )

Latest Month

November 2019
S M T W T F S
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Syndicated Times puzzles

Free online editions of UK dictionaries

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Tiffany Chow