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Times Cryptic 27446

Solving time: 41 minutes. I found this one quite straightforward. Although there were a couple of obscurities they didn't delay me unduly.




As usual definitions are underlined in bold italics, {deletions and substitutions are in curly brackets} and [anagrinds, containment, reversal and other indicators in square ones]



Across
1 Against mum's the word "nonsense" (4)
TOSH : TO (against), SH (mum's the word)
3 £51 rise arranged? This might make things go smoothly (10)
LIQUIDISER : LI (51), QUID (£), anagram [arranged] of RISE
9 Opening large part of church (7)
CHANCEL : CHANCE (opening),  L (large). It's the part near the altar that's usually reserved for priests and choir.
11 Obsolete furnace regularly comes in handy (7)
DEFUNCT : {f}U{r}N{a}C{e} [regularly] is contained by [comes in] DEFT (handy)
12 Perhaps I fix judgement (13)
PRONOUNCEMENT : PRONOUN (perhaps I), CEMENT (fix)
14 What will hold little new in clothes (5)
TONGS : N (little new), contained by [in] TOGS (clothes)
15 Swimming rat is with an aquatic mammal dealer (9)
TRADESMAN : Anagram [swimming] of RAT, DESMAN (aquatic mammal). I've never heard of this creature: Either of two semi-aquatic insectivorous shrewlike mammals of the mole family Talpidae, Desmana moschata of Russia, and Galemys pyrenaicus of the Pyrenees (SOED). This seems to be its first appearance in a 15x15. Google reveals that it has turned up once in a Times Two puzzle and on three occasions in Mephistos.
17 Country's in the middle of Blitz - thus panic, man (9)
LITHUANIA : {b}LIT{z}, {t}HU{s}, {p}ANI{c}, {m}A{n} [middle of]
19 Walrus, perhaps with the beginning of tusk pain (5)
TACHE : T{usk} [beginning], ACHE (pain). Famous wearers of this type of moustache include Theodore Roosevelt and Mark Twain.
21 Obscure university name one with child identifying as the other sex (13)
UNTRANSPARENT : U (university), N (name), TRANS (identifying as the other sex), PARENT (one with child)
24 Sanction sellers? Not very English (7)
ENDORSE : {v}ENDORS (sellers) [not very], E (English)
25 Old language of a Roman emperor, missing core of Latin (7)
IBERIAN : {t}IBERIAN (of a Roman emperor) [missing core of Latin]
26 Message to many that might have felt tremor in a quake (4,6)
FORM LETTER : Anagram [in a quake] of FELT TREMOR. Not quite the term I'm familiar with but it's a standardised letter sent to many people.
27 Knock down chap that emits a cry of pain (4)
FELL : FELL{ow} (chap) [emits a cry of pain - ow!]
Down
1 Great many turned up about London, say, as the top attraction (2,3,2,3)
TO CAP IT ALL : LOT (great many) reversed [turned up] containing [about] CAPITAL (London, say)
2 Petty quarrel gets personal - cure may be found here (3,4)
SPA TOWN : SPAT (petty quarrel), OWN (personal)
4 Long sit-in arranged in left-leaning London borough (9)
ISLINGTON : Anagram [arranged] of LONG SIT IN. A hot-bed of socialism if the Daily Mail is to be believed, but anyway its two constituencies (North and South) are represented in Parliament by Jeremy Corbyn and Emily Thornbury, neither of whom could be mistaken for darlings of the right.
5 European Union up for supporting German and extreme (5)
UNDUE : UND (German 'and'), EU (European Union) reversed [up]
6 Classify as separate after definite mutating (13)
DIFFERENTIATE : Anagram [mutating] of AFTER DEFINITE
7 Reserved space putting in new court for the centre of Salisbury (7)
SANCTUM : N (new) + CT (court) replaces [for] the centre of SA{r}UM (Salisbury). 'Sarum' can refer to the modern city of Salisbury or the ruins of the old one, and is often preceded by 'New' or 'Old' in order to 6dn.
8 List of those working for Catholic court (4)
ROTA : Two meanings, the second being unknown to me
10 Bridging a gap to get over very popular river (5-8)
CROSS-CULTURAL : CROSS (get over), CULT (very popular), URAL (river). 'Very popular among a particular group of people' might be a more accurate definiton of 'cult', and the group itself might be very small.
13 Like a gut feeling during exam over last missing header (10)
INTESTINAL : IN (during), TEST (exam), {f}INAL  (last) [missing header]
16 A mother pig that's found in mud? (5,4)
ADAMS WINE : A, DAM (mother), SWINE (pig). Colloquially this is 'water' and water is a consituent of mud, but is there something more to the definition that I'm missing?
18 Tail end of shift hours leading subordinate to crack? (7)
THUNDER : {shif}T [tail end], H (hours), UNDER (subordinate to). As in the expression 'crack of thunder'.
20 Loose garment with edging is used in church (7)
CHEMISE : HEM (edging) + IS contained by [used in] CE (church)
22 Expert working on involving deputy (5)
ADEPT : AT (working on) containing [involving] DEP (deputy)
23 British raised charge for grouse (4)
BEEF : B (British), FEE (charge) reversed [raised]. Both terms are slang for complain or moan. Many of the pubs in the villages near where I live are old buildings with low beams in the ceilings and display notices warning taller customers to 'Duck or Grouse!'

Comments

( 48 comments — Leave a comment )
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bletchleyreject
Sep. 3rd, 2019 02:02 am (UTC)
I bombed out in the SE for a DNF in just under an hour. Entered TRADESMAN in hope, then 'aves(pas)ian' for the 'Old language' at 25a and had a mental blank for SWINE at 16d, entering 'slake' instead. I'd only heard of 'Adam's ale' for 'water' - when you go to Wikipedia for ADAMS WINE, that's where you're re-directed.

I'm not too keen on UNTRANSPARENT - a good word for management-speak, but not much else. PRONOUNCEMENT was my favourite.

Thank you to setter and blogger.
Stuart Dunlop
Sep. 3rd, 2019 09:00 pm (UTC)
Can we justify the position of trans then parent instead of parent then trans?
(no subject) - kevingregg - Sep. 3rd, 2019 09:26 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - gothick_matt - Sep. 3rd, 2019 09:30 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - jackkt - Sep. 3rd, 2019 10:34 pm (UTC) - Expand
vinyl1
Sep. 3rd, 2019 03:03 am (UTC)
I did manage to finish....
...although I was nearly falling asleep for most of my solve - all the Labor Day picnics are getting to me. I should actually have been much quicker, as most of the clues were quite straightforward, with little in the way of hidden definitions.
isla3
Sep. 3rd, 2019 03:12 am (UTC)
Way off the wavelength, just couldn't see where many of the clues were pointing. Got there in the end with only 3 guessable unknowns, the desman, rota and Adam's wine, so no complaints. Liked spa town, was expecting something a little &littish like sit-down.
Overall: setter 1, solver 0.
gothick_matt
Sep. 3rd, 2019 06:00 am (UTC)
Found this hard to get started, fun in the middle, but impossible to finish. I've just read a book which mentioned a lot of Roman emperors, and Tiberius might've been among them, but I couldn't come up with him, especially as I'd also never heard of ADAM'S WINE (only Adam's ale) and only had the first half of 16d.

My hour bell went off when I was still trying to think of what mud could have been to Adam.
paulmcl
Sep. 3rd, 2019 06:25 am (UTC)
I DNF since I went for SELL instead of FELL, since "knock down" can mean sell in a auction, but I didn't see how the rest of the clue worked (obv because it didn't). But the rest was fine despite unknowns like DESMAN and ADAMS WINE.
kevingregg
Sep. 3rd, 2019 06:54 am (UTC)
34:49 but
This was a slog from the start, capped by a failure to check a biffed entry. DESMAN never occurred to me--spent some time trying to work in OTTER, then just gave up and biffed. TACHE took ages, even though I've seen it here a few times; we say 'stache/stash' (well, I don't, but). But I got them in the end, but forgot to go back and examine UNDIE. I'm another who's never come across ADAM'S WINE.
sawbill
Sep. 3rd, 2019 07:04 am (UTC)
24 minutes
Straightforward for me. Liked PRONOUNCEMENT. If we were expected to consider everything that water is found in, it would be a very long list.
keriothe
Sep. 3rd, 2019 10:31 am (UTC)
RE: 24 minutes
And mud doesn’t necessarily have water in it, whatever the dictionaries say. Not that it caused me a problem: I had no idea what ADAM’S WINE was but what else are you going to do with ‘pig’ and S_I_E?
mrkgrnao
Sep. 3rd, 2019 07:26 am (UTC)
Desman has a burrow in the marketplace
I remember Desman coming up a few years ago in a 15x15, clued as a mole. Reminded me of a song I'd heard. Fell at the last today alas.

Edited at 2019-09-03 07:27 am (UTC)
myrtilus000
Sep. 3rd, 2019 07:45 am (UTC)
RE: Desman has a burrow in the marketplace
Brilliant heading!
Re: Desman has a burrow in the marketplace - john_dun - Sep. 3rd, 2019 10:13 am (UTC) - Expand
z8b8d8k
Sep. 3rd, 2019 07:56 am (UTC)
No-one expects...
21.30, agonising over ROTA having no idea about the Catholic court, puzzling over ADAM'S WINE (I agree about the "found in mud" definition - weird) and missing out on the Russian insectivore (no zoo I've been in has one).
I didn't fully crack 1d: the enumeration kind of made it easily fillable and I don't think I got beyond the sounzabitlike capital.
Back in my Hackney days, I did quite a bit of work (I was helping people into employment) in the grottier bits of Islington: His Tonyness used to live in one of the posher bits, Jezza still does, as (I think) does Neil Kinnock. Even Lenin called it home once, so its left leaning credentials are impeccable, were it not for the super-gentrification that it has endured/enjoyed, such that Boris only moved out when he got the flat over the shop in Downing Street.
z8b8d8k
Sep. 3rd, 2019 07:59 am (UTC)
Re: No-one expects...
Oh, and for Douglas Adams fans, there really is an estate agent called Hotblack Desiato.
boltonwanderer
Sep. 3rd, 2019 07:57 am (UTC)
An untransparent puzzle
A full fifty minutes on this, with LOI IBERIAN. I've never heard of ADAM'S WINE. We called water ADAM'S ALE. Perhaps this is the Waitrose version. It had to be TRADESMAN, but I've never knowingly met a desman.I wasn't sure that CROSS-CULTURAL quite worked, but I guess a cult figure is a popular one. COD to SPA TOWN, only hit upon when all the sea options had been exhausted. Thank you Jack and setter.
jackkt
Sep. 3rd, 2019 08:25 am (UTC)
Re: An untransparent puzzle
Brewer's suggests that 'Adam's wine' is a Scottish variant on 'Adam's ale'.
myrtilus000
Sep. 3rd, 2019 08:02 am (UTC)
The road to Endorse easy to tread, for mother or yearning wife...
35 mins with yoghurt, granola, etc.
Mostly I liked the LI Quid iser.
I am pleased to have learned of a (NHO before) Desman - the cute, little, snouty chap.
Thanks to the setter and J.
quailthrush
Sep. 3rd, 2019 08:49 am (UTC)
Maybe water is referred to as ADAMS WINE (though nobody seems to have come across this) but "found in mud" as a definition?? Dreadful clue. I think the setter got carried away by a nice surface.
robrolfe
Sep. 3rd, 2019 09:01 am (UTC)
I wonder if the setter was thinking of how Adam was made (the word 'adam' is the same as 'earth') and conflated two things?

I am now fixated on famous Desmans.

22'22” thanks jack and setter.

eniamretrauq
Sep. 3rd, 2019 09:28 am (UTC)
34 mins with help
Why is it that I always get stuck on the last one? In this case it was -E-L where I was trying to work on it why it was YELL without much luck. I had the clue a... over t.. of course.
And no, I’ve no idea about the mud either. COD PRONOUNCEMENT simple but effective
philjordan
Sep. 3rd, 2019 09:54 am (UTC)
Not on the wavelength at all
Gave up after 20 minutes, having been stuck for the last 8 of those with four missing.

I deliberately went straight to UNTRANSPARENT when I came here, and, in the unlikely event of my having solved it (I really dislike it now it's explained), I would have got CROSS-CULTURAL.

I considered IBERIAN, but wasn't sure it was a language, and couldn't see the emperor. Perhaps he was wearing new clothes....

ADAM'S WINE also eluded me, but probably shouldn't have done. NHO DESMAN. or the religious meaning of ROTA. At least I solved those two.

COD PRONOUNCEMENT
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