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September 28th, 2019

A perfectly fine cryptic jumbo this with a couple of bits of advanced vocab. at 45 minutes including parsing everything, on my scale that makes it just on the harder side of average.

First in was BEDEW, last was er, I can't remember, and I forgot to take a note.

Clues are in blue with the definition undelined.  Anagram indicators are in bold italics.

Notation:

DD: Double definition

CD: Cryptic definition

DDCDH: DD/CD hybrid where a straight definition is combined with a cryptic hint.

&Lit:  "all in one" where the entire clue is both definition and wordplay.

(fodder)* denotes an anagram of the letters in the brackets.

Rounded brackets are also used to add further clarity

Squiggly brackets {} indicate parts of a word not used

Deletions are struck out

Square brackets [] expand an abbreviation or shortening like N[orth]


Across

1

Snow vehicle made by fellow with a lot of skill (9)


BOBSLEIGH - BOB, SLEIGH{t}

6

Garden plot you and I returned to sprinkle with water (5)


BEDEW - BED, WE reversed.  Lovely word.

9

Bully tried, we hear, to be animal minder (7)


COWHERD - COW then homophone of HEARD

13

Language used by girl in Gothenburg (5)


LINGO - hidden

14

Masterminds terrible crimes ultimately looked into by court (7)


DIRECTS - DIRE {crime}S around C[our]T

15

Soldiers protected by a welcome treaty (9)


AGREEMENT - A GREET around MEN

16

Not working in music drama, Victor invested in formal wear (11)


INOPERATIVE - IN, OPERA, V[ictor] in TIE

17

New gal on deck we indicate recognition of (11)


ACKNOWLEDGE - (gal on deck we)*

18

Fairly easy on the eye (6)


PRETTY - DD

19

Crazy about novelties at first, like some religious paintings (8)


MADONNAS - MAD, ON, N{ovelties}, AS

21

What may carry wine from a service in church (6)


CARAFE - A R[oyal] A[ir] F[orce] in C[hurch of] E[ngland]

25

Positions on network set up by spinners? (8)


WEBSITES - spidery CD

26

Capital speech revised finally by this US general? (7,7)


ESTUARY ENGLISH - ({b}y this us general)*.  Wot they speak in London and Essex and that.

28

Host’s decoration for gallantry mentioned in speech (5)


EMCEE - Sounds like MC (M[ilitary] C[ross])

29

Sweltering temperature not initially disagreeable (6)


TORRID - T[emperature], hORRID.  I normally think of the "having a torrid time" meaning but the hot and steamy meaning seems to come first in most dictionaries.

30

From which we may observe vehicle pulling timepiece behind? (10)


WATCHTOWER - DDCDH.  It took me a while to get my head around this as what I took to be the wordplay didn't seem to work (with "behind" acting as some kind of positional indicator), but it's just a case of a vehicle pulling a timepiece technically being a watch tower.

33

Fantastic hour we secured in model generating plant (10)


POWERHOUSE - (hour we) in POSE

35

Blokes in US city originally translating funeral song (6)


LAMENT - MEN in L[os] A[ngeles] T{ranslating}

36

Scent ultimately left by wading bird (5)


TRAIL - {lef}T, RAIL

38

Sick of rude Brit, find illicit pleasure (9,5)


FORBIDDEN FRUIT - (of rude brit find)*

40

Local woman keeping a fabric for making coats (8)


BARATHEA - BAR, THEA around A.  The only Thea I know of is Country singer Gilmore of that ilk.  Barathea is one of those words that women throw at you and expect you to know exactly what it is.  "She was wearing an ecru barathea coat with scalloped pockets".  Huh?

42

Set free, once a ship has fuel (6)


ASSOIL - A S[ingle-screw] S[teamship], OIL.  One for Mephisto fans.

43

Old adversary giving up work as interpretative artist (8)


EXPONENT - EX opPONENT (OP = OPUS)

44

Girl oddly eager to enter for baccalaureate, say (6)


DEGREE - E[a}G{e}R in DEE.  Another hardly widespread girl's name.  The only one who comes readily to mind is Dee Hepburn off of Gregory's Girl, and she was overshadowed by Clare Grogan.

47

Expensive-sounding Society speech-maker’s peaked cap (11)


DEERSTALKER - Homphone for DEAR then S[ociety], TALKER.  What is it about those hats that make them suitable for stalking deer eh?

50

Objets-d’art I see in choir trips (11)


CHINOISERIE - (I see in choir)*

52

Genuineness, as it is revealed in certain lines (9)


SINCERITY - SINCE, IT in R[ailwa]Y

53

European heading off W African or Russian, perhaps (7)


IBERIAN - Take your pick from lIBERIAN and sIBERIAN

54

Split with first of boyfriends in Gt London borough (5)


BRENT - RENT with B{oyfriends}

55

Mechanic having rest over in Irish islands (7)


ARTISAN - SIT reversed in ARAN.  Just when I was getting used to TARSUS being plural we now get "islands" clued as Aran.  So the Aran Islands are also known as The Arans but, and here's the clincher, they constitute the barony of Aran.

56

Prestige finally attained by university in Aegean island (5)


KUDOS - {attaine}D next to U{niversity} in KOS (aka the Ko Islands) (not really)

57

Resident in Bow primarily employed in role of carer (4,5)


EAST ENDER - E{mployed} AS TENDER.  My daughter told me she didn't believe I was a real cockney, so I made her go up the oranges and pears to bed (after brushing her Haywards).

Down

1

Spicy dish served by restaurant finally in Indonesian island (5)


BALTI - {restauran}T in BALI

2

Try one’s hardest, having man support proteges around town (4,4,9)


BEND OVER BACKWARDS - BEN, BACK, WARDS around DOVER. I probably wasn't alone in trying to think of a x ONE'S y expression.  Ben Dover is married to Eileen.

3

Waterside plant, most unrestrained, widely encountered (11)


LOOSESTRIFE - LOOSEST, RIFE. The wordplay gets you there, in a Poirot sort of way - once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.

4

Single chap touring North Dakota, one from Mumbai, perhaps (6)


INDIAN - I, IAN around N[orth] [D]akota

5

Scold desperate man ousting Rex’s son? (8)


HARRIDAN - (desperate) DAN (is that a peculiarly British cultural reference?) replacing the SON in (Rex) HARRISON.  Scold in its nounal sense.

6

Composer’s joint function held after turning up for 44 (12)


BACHELORSHIP - The answer to 44a being "degree"

7

Superior female attorney protecting son almost entirely (10)


DISDAINFUL - DI D[istrict] A[ttorney] around S[on] then IN FUL{l}

8

Share wallop (5)


WHACK - DD

9

Scroll-like ornament needing attention outside area in Rugby (9)


CARTOUCHE - CARE around TOUCH

10

His products may be employed in revolutionary activity (11)


WHEELWRIGHT - CD

11

Some of them endeavour to improve (5)


EMEND - hidden

12

Vacillate, disheartening a digger of trenches (6)


DITHER - DITcHER

18

Authority framing key advert for cosmetic applicator (6,4)


POWDER PUFF - POWER around D then PUFF

20

One who is barely recognisable running in a public place (8)


STREAKER - CD.  Anyone else got a Ray Stevens earworm?  Or an Erica Roe eyeworm?

22

Infer warder is involved with a thief, an unreliable acquaintance (4-7,6)


FAIR-WEATHER FRIEND - (infer warder a thief)*

23

Chap in Albert Square who audibly identifies a species of penguin? (6)


GENTOO - GENT, 'OO (soundee-likee for "who" as spoken by an East Ender)

24

Break for sailors and soldiers on meadow in southern resort (5,5)


SHORE LEAVE - R[oyal] E[ngineers] on LEA in S[outhern] HOVE

27

Spirit of quiet home this writer had abandoned (8)


PRESENCE - P[iano] RESi'dENCE

31

Doze setting up soldier, possibly, in beret (6)


CATNAP - ANT reversed in CAP

32

Undergarment, one thieves reportedly deposited at bottom of river (12)


CAMIKNICKERS - I, NICKERS homophone after CAM

34

State of decay our sinuses suffer around November (11)


RUINOUSNESS - (our sinuses)* around N[ovember]

36

List including partygoers that can be passed over (11)


TRAVERSABLE - TABLE around RAVERS

37

Having possessions, appeared at last with appropriate connection (10)


PROPERTIED - {appeare}D next to PROPER TIE

39

Dog frantically tailed a man dumping drug (9)


DALMATIAN - (tailed a man)* without E

41

Popular female in east holds it to be eternal (8)


INFINITE - IN F[emale] IN E[ast] around IT

45

Poems by Tasso regularly turning up in Ukrainian port (6)


ODESSA - ODES, then {t}A{s}S{o} reversed.  Word of the month in September crosswords?

46

Aims to get tips? (6)


POINTS - DD

48

He painted birds of prey, wasting energy and time (5)


ERNST - ERNeS, T[ime].  Max, the German surrealist.  I'm a Magritte man myself.

49

Inuit canoe seen going up and down (5)


KAYAK - Palindrome.  Don't try to build a fire in one - you can't have your kayak and heat it.

51

Go into hospital department, about to get rise (5)


ENTER - E[ar] N[ose and] T[hroat], RE reversed.
I was still in China when this puzzle appeared, so I enjoyed the local colour of 21ac. The puzzle seemed to have an unusually high proportion of clues simply requiring us to assemble (or disassemble) the pieces, and I finished rather quickly. I felt enlightened by 17ac and 25ac, and baffled by 23ac.

How did others find it? Thanks to the setter for a very enjoyable puzzle.

Clues are blue, with definitions underlined. Answers are in BOLD CAPS, then wordplay. (ABC*) means ‘anagram of ABC’. Deletions are in [square brackets]. The blog is in Times New Roman font, as part of a gentle campaign to urge the club site to use a font in which it is easier to tell one’s stem from one’s stern.

Across
1 Put plan into action (8)
DEPLOYED – PLOY in DEED, giving a past tense verb.

9 Subtle meaning from obvious figure (8)
OVERTONE – OVERT, ONE.

10 Dance enthusiast circling with energy (8)
FANDANGO – F(AND)AN (FAN=enthusiast ‘circling’ AND=with), GO.

11 Country-lover dismantled rails blocking track (8)
RURALIST – (RAILS*), ‘dismantled’, in RUT.

12 Not mad about silver? It's really popular! (3,3,4)
ALL THE RAGE – ALL THERE about AG.

14 Distinguished singer keen to make comeback (4)
DIVA – AVID ‘making comeback’.

15 East German prosperous one refusing to see truth (7)
OSTRICH – OST is German for ‘east’, RICH.

17 Wisecrack hit hard in EU perhaps (7)
DIGRAPH – EU as in ‘euphony’ is a digraph: two letters representing a single sound. Made up as: DIG, RAP, H (hard).

21 Asian rhino has cat leave Mexican state (4)
YUAN – take the CAT out of YU[cat]AN to get the money (rhino) we used in Wuhan.

22 Tricky losing ground in New York location (4,6)
LONG ISLAND – (LOSING*) ‘tricky’, then LAND (ground). The setter’s cunning is to make ‘ground’ look like the anagram indicator!

23 Column places upright character in smear (8)
PILASTER – I in PLASTER. I only suspected there might be such a word, and had no idea how to spell it. Luckily the wordplay is generous! LOI.

25 French symbol originally Armenian (8)
MARIANNE – (ARMENIAN*) ‘originally’. Didn’t know of her, but she is indeed an important French symbol!

26 Political opponent disappeared in tragedy (8)
ANTIGONE – ANTI, GONE.

27 Performer pleads to return in Hamlet? (8)
DANSEUSE – SUES ‘returning’ inside DANE.


Down
2 Initially poor lawyer enjoys success after test cases (8)
EXAMPLES – EXAM (test), then the first letters of Poor Lawyer Enjoys Success.

3 Heavenly guide in oceans called on sailor (8)
LODESTAR – LODES sounds like ‘loads’ (oceans), TAR (sailor).

4 Himalayan beast devours North American (4)
YANK – YAK ‘devours’ N.

5 Commissionaire almost asleep — nothing coming in (7)
DOORMAN – DORMAN[t] with O ‘coming in’.

6 Order for the match to be abandoned (6,4)
DECREE NISI – cryptic definition. A marriage, not a cricket match in sunny England!

7 Accomplish little around Caribbean republic (8)
DOMINICA – DO MINI, CA (around).

8 Eruption from explosive with a wreck below (4,4)
HEAT RASH – H.E. (high explosive), A, TRASH.

13 Rapid rise battered a coastline (10)
ESCALATION – (A COASTLINE*) ‘battered’.

15 Athlete soft spoken old Scotsman entertains (8)
OLYMPIAN – LYMP sounds like LIMP ‘spoken’, ‘entertained by’ O[ld] IAN (the usual Scotsman!).

16 An idiot in the cast — one dries up regularly (3,5)
TEA CLOTH – A CLOT in (THE*) ‘cast’.

18 Lower rank includes English cricket side (8)
RELEGATE – RATE (rank) ‘includes’ E LEG. The answer is a verb.

19 Animal with rising sun seen in tropical tree (8)
PANDANUS – PANDA, then SUN ‘rising’.

20 Defenceless but intact in Albert Square? (7)
UNARMED – UN[h]ARMED, with the usual device about Cockney speech.

24 See female leaving opera gives smile (4)
GRIN – the opera is [Lohen]GRIN. Remove LO and HEN.
Not that there’s anything “off” about this puzzle. I found it generally satisfying, with a few interesting bits of vocab, and nothing to complain about.

No, the title references my word of the day, PROROGUE, selected for what I expect is an obvious reason. (Are you PRO ROGUE?) I wonder how long this puzzle had been waiting in the queue. The song may not be quite appropriate, but I couldn’t resist when I remembered the sense of “Thing” as the name of a parliament. Ha.

I do (sargamna)* like this, and italicize anagrinds in the clues.


ACROSS
 1 Method of very quietly feeding a fish (8)
APPROACH — A(PP)ROACH
 5 Switch feet from right to left (4)
SWAP — PAWS<=
10 Spread coal tar on canine’s sensitive area (4,5)
ROOT CANAL — (coal tar on)*
11 Thrash sides in financial trouble (5)
FLAIL — F[-inancia]L + AIL
12 Cons finally ask to wear jumpers (5)
ROOKS — ROO([-as]K)S
13 Device for controlling temperature in our lager supply (9)
REGULATOR — (our lager)*
14 Drink to lacrosse’s first summer league table (6,6)
SQUASH LADDER — ”Drink” is SQUASH, + L[-acrosse] + ADDER (“summer”). My LOI, although a term I must have come across here at least once in the past several years.
18 Patron’s complaint about new leading lady (12)
BENEFACTRESS — BE(N)EF + ACTRESS
21 Game youngsters enjoy drink on short flight (9)
HOPSCOTCH — HOP, “short flight” + SCOTCH, “drink”
22 Hill showing a kind of lily every now and again (5)
KNOLL — Alternate letters in “a KiNd Of LiLy.” Decrypted, the grammar is inverse of the usual; in the surface, the hill shows the lilies, but in the cryptic, it’s the other way around.
23 Cause ground to dip (5)
SAUCE — (cause)* I can’t see “to” as a wordplay/definition connector, so it must be part of the anagrind—appropriately enough, ha, since you have to grind the anagrist to or into (so that it becomes) a word for “dip.”
24 Musical rushed without Romeo’s back story (9)
NARRATIVE — EVITA (“musical”) + R(R)AN <= (R being “Romeo” in the NATO alphabet)
25 Reason not to write copy one in pen? (4)
OINK — O (0) INK! Not the smoothest surface, with “copy one” seemingly meaning “the first copy.” There is overlap between the CD and the definition with “in pen,” but “Reason not to write” could stand alone as the hint for “[zero] ink,” with one’s scribing implement implicit.
26 What’s left after Scotland’s last energy commission (8)
DELEGACY — [-Scotlan]D + E(nergy) + LEGACY, “what’s left.” Not sure I’ve ever encountered this word in the wild.

DOWN
 1 Doctor photographs strain and graze (8)
AIRBRUSH — AIR, “strain,” and BRUSH, “graze”… My first exposure to the technique was through, ahem, certain photographs in certain magazines that I collected as a teenager.
 2 Stop meeting hooker, reprobate! (8)
PROROGUE — PRO, “hooker” + ROGUE, “reprobate”
 3 Run around, trapped by unusually big predators (5)
ORCAS — O(R)(CA)S
 4 It combats the cold charm heartlessly used in infidelity (7,7)
CENTRAL HEATING — C(ENT[-h]RAL)HEATING
 6 Spirit of one consumed by rage (6)
WRAITH — WRA(I)TH
 7 Not worth having drink after uplift on tax (6)
PALTRY — LAP<= + TRY, “tax”
 8 Harp on a floor’s edge had to be moved (4,1,4,5)
FLOG A DEAD HORSE — (a floor’s edge)* Over here in the New World, the expression is “beating a dead horse,” but this was my FOI anyway, and I was off to a flying start.
 9 Waste product’s first to go after a flush (8)
AFFLUENT — Ick! A + [-e]FFLUENT
15 Whiffs of fish start to escape aboard ship (8)
STENCHES — S(TENCH)(E[-scape]S
16 Class hasn’t finished eating most of old pudding (8)
SEMOLINA — How unappetizing! SEM(OL[-d])INA[-r]
17 Instrument displaying pressure change in case of seismicity (8)
PSALTERY — P(resssure) + S(ALTER)Y
19 Treatment for the ear, face and heart of lion (6)
PHYSIO — Sounds like “phiz,” Dickensian slang for the face (physiognomy) + [-l]IO[-n]. Collins says “phiz” is obsolete in the US but still current in the UK. I wrote “Dickensian” before I was reminded that “Phiz” was the pen name of Boz’s illustrator. The answer is short for “physiotherapy.”
20 Rang up policy section about dispute (6)
OPPUGN — Reverse hidden. To OPPUGN is to challenge, contradict, as an argument, while to “impugn” is to attack. Dictionaries are telling me the latter is “obsolete” and the former is current, though I would have guessed the opposite, having often heard of someone’s reputation being impugned, and having hardly, if ever, seen OPPUGN…
22 King, lacking experience, banishing just the one scoundrel (5)
KNAVE — K + NA[-i]VE