vinyl1 (vinyl1) wrote in times_xwd_times,
vinyl1
vinyl1
times_xwd_times

Times 26647 - Whatever letters are left....

Solving time: 24 minutes

Music: Grieg, Piano Concerto, Rubinstein/Wallenstein






When I first ran through the clues of this puzzle, I thought I was in for a tough time. I could not see a single answer until I came to 27, which was the obvious anagram I had been looking for. But as more crossing letters became available, my solving speeded up. Then, too, I have become more adept at the practice of letting the cryptic guide me, and just writing in parts of likely words until the answer magically appears.

All the answers are well within the normal range of vocabulary, except possibly for 'shillelagh', which might present spelling difficulties but for the very helpful cryptic. Of course, I should have seen the long one down the middle at first glance, but I'm sure I'm not the only one who didn't.

I don't have much to say about my new role as keeper of the TFTT blogging flame. I'm sure it will be interesting, and I have have a few ideas of how to improve the site. For now, things will run on pretty much as before, although we did have to pick up a new blogger to help fill the Saturday slot.

Across
1PASSPORT, PASS + PORT. Simple, but ironically my LOI, just because I was expecting something far more complicated.
6PLANET, PLANE + T. I put this in an erased it, not seeing how a 'plane' can be a 'craft' - isn't it a tree? Ooops, now I see it.
9POMADE, PO(MAD)E.
10KNOTHOLE, sounds like NOT WHOLE to most speakers. They must have pronounced the 'K' at one time, but I don't think it has persisted in any dialect.
11GLAD, GLAD[e].
12SHILLELAGH, S(HILL + GALE backward)H. Other spellings are possible
14SEAFRONT, SE(AFRO)NT, a promenade, that is. I had put in 'serenade', i.e. SEREN(AD)E, which looked good for about thirty seconds and then got erased.
16PITY, PI[e]TY.
18DELI, I LED backwards.
19AROUSING, [c]AROUSING.
21ON THE ROCKS, double definition, and quite an easy one.
22CUTE, CU[ra]TE.
24BLESS YOU, B[ishop] + anagram of YES, SOUL.
26IDIOCY, I[sland] + DI(O)CY.
27OYSTER, anagram of SET + ROY. A dated term, which I associate with the colloquial speech of the 1890-1930 period.
28TAKE NOTE, T(A KEN)OTE, a clever cryptic, but 'range of knowledge' tends to give it away.
 
Down
2ATOLL, A TO L + L. I wanted to biff 'dozen' as another letter-removal answer, but couldn't justify it.
3STANDOFFISH, STANDOFF + IS + [clas]H, the well-known Billingsgate establishment.
4OVERSHOT, OVER(SHO[p])T. I knew this would have 'shop' in it somehow, but I needed the crossers to discover exactly where.
5TAKE INTO ACCOUNT, double definition, one rather factitious.
6POORLY, PO(OR)LY, where OR is given a more explicit definition than usual.
7ASH, [b]ASH, in its slang sense of having a bash at.
8ENLIGHTEN, anagram of IN THE GLEN. Recent arrivals are reminded that misleading capitalization is not considered unfair.
13LIPOSUCTION, anagram of NO POLITICS + U[nusual]. I wanted to make this '-section' for the longest time, but there is obviously no 'e'.
15ETERNALLY, E[x]TERNALLY, another letter-removal clue.
17JOYSTICK, JOY + STICK.
20PRAYER, P(-L,+R)AYER, a letter-substitution clue.
23TACIT, T + AC(I)T, where 'tango' refers to the NATO alphabet.
25SIT, S[u]IT. Yes, we finish with a letter-removal clue.
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