vinyl1 (vinyl1) wrote in times_xwd_times,
vinyl1
vinyl1
times_xwd_times

Times 26611 - Let there be music!

Solving time: 24 minutes

Music: Glazunov, Symphony #3, Fedoseyev/Moscow Radio Symphony






I thought this was going to be a really easy puzzle, as I raced through the top half, only to lose my groove as I started on the bottom. It wasn't that much more difficult, but this setter likes to use words a little loosely, which caused me some difficulties, along with some clever definitions. I had to biff a few because I couldn't make heads or tails of the cryptics.

Yes, there is now music in Connecticut. I have completed my move, and approximately 4000 records got transported 65 miles or so; not by me, but by very strong moving men. Each of the 35 boxes weighed 62 pounds. So far I have unpacked only the classical, but there is still plenty to play. The system sounds much better here because of lack of ambient noise, and I get much better detail at lower volumes.

So now for the blog, with a few cryptics yet to be resolved.

Across
1SYCAMORE, anagram of MAY SCORE, my FOI and quite obvious because the 'ore' is not broken up.
5MARAUD, MA(RA)UD. Some knowledge of 19th-century English poetry is useful here, but not essential.
10HEART OF DARKNESS, anagram of ADHERENTS ASK FOR, but I just biffed it from the enumeration and the first letter.
11SHAWNEE, SHAW + NEE.
12FEATHER, F(E)ATHER, a bit of obscure terminology for non-ballroom-dancers, but obvious enough from the cryptic.
13STAMPEDE, STAMPED + [Shuttl]E.
15DRAFT, D(R)AFT, a Nato alphabet clue. A 'draft' and an 'outline' are not exactly the same thing.
18CORAL, CO(R)AL. I got this one wrong in a previous blog, and I'm not going to make the same mistake twice!
20TOM THUMB, TOM + THUMB. It is evident that 'hitch' must = 'thumb', and 'dogs' means 'comes after', but I don't quite see how 'Tom' = 'woman of the night'. However, the answer seems correct.
23NAPHTHA, NAP + H + THA[t]. I didn't understand this when I solved it, but research has found that in horse race betting, a 'nap' is a tip that is highly likely to prove accurate.
25SWANSON, SWAN SON[g], a bit of a chestnut.
26HUNTINGDONSHIRE, HUNTING + DONS + HIRE.
27SILENT, double definition, as the 'P' in 'Psycho' is not pronounced in English, although it certainly was in classical Greek.
27MARTINET, MARTIN + [m]E[a]T.
 
Down
1SCHISM, SCH + ISM, which represents any ideology.
2CHARACTER, double definition. I don't see exactly what sense of 'case' is meant, but there are many to chose from..
3METONYM, M(ETON,Y)M. If you biffed 'metanym', you should know that the Greek word for 'name' is 'onymos', and chopping off the first letter is not allowed. However, you are free to cut 'meta-' down to 'met-'.
4RIFLE, double definition, easy clue.
6AWKWARD, [h]AWK + WARD.
7ALEPH, ALE + P.H., a brilliant clue with a very well-disguised literal.
8DISCRETE, [lan]D + IS + CRETE.
9HALF-TERM, HAL(F)TER + M. Some knowledge of the academic calendar in the UK is useful here.
14ESTRANGE, [b]EST RANGE. Again, 'estrange' is not exactly 'break up', but they are close enough.
16ADMISSION, double definition.
17ACANTHUS, A CAN THUS.
19LATVIAN, anagram of VALIANT.
21HEADSET, HEAD SET.
22INSECT, IN SECT, a chestnut concealed only by a clever literal.
24PANEL, PAN 'EL'.
25SHONA, S(H + ON)A. I never heard of it; more properly given as 'Seonag', which would allow you to recognize the Welsh and Irish cognates more easily.
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